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David Tennant

David Tennant

Birthday: 18 April 1971, Bathgate, West Lothian, Scotland, UK
Birth Name: David John McDonald
Height: 185 cm

David Tennant was born David John McDonald in West Lothian, Scotland, to Essdale Helen (McLeod) and Sandy McDonald, who was a Presbyterian minister. He is of Scottish and Ulster-Scots descent. When he ...Show more

David Tennant
To me, it feels like The Doctor has to have a long coat, and that's something imprinted on me from c Show more To me, it feels like The Doctor has to have a long coat, and that's something imprinted on me from childhood, because he always did. And there's something heroic in a flapping coat, but at the same time, I need to get rid of it sometimes and just be a scrawny guy in a suit that doesn't quite fit. Hide
Unlike other enduring characters such as Sherlock Holmes or Tarzan, being the Doctor allows you a ce Show more Unlike other enduring characters such as Sherlock Holmes or Tarzan, being the Doctor allows you a certain freedom that is both very demanding and very thrilling. It allows you to make the character using elements of yourself. Hide
I was sent good luck cards from Tom Baker and Peter Davison. They were the Doctors I grew up watchin Show more I was sent good luck cards from Tom Baker and Peter Davison. They were the Doctors I grew up watching, while eating toast and drinking Tizer at home, so I was very honoured. Hide
I was hugely formed by stories I was told as a child whether that was in a book, the cinema, theatre Show more I was hugely formed by stories I was told as a child whether that was in a book, the cinema, theatre or television and probably television more than any medium is what influenced me as a child and formed my response to literature, story-telling and, therefore, the world around me. Hide
(On The Doctor and Rose) They weren't shagging in the TARDIS, because that would be weird. (On The Doctor and Rose) They weren't shagging in the TARDIS, because that would be weird.
Animation is a fascinating area from an acting point of view because it's not really like anything e Show more Animation is a fascinating area from an acting point of view because it's not really like anything else because you are only providing a portion of the performance. That's very inspiring and it forces you to do things in a different way - to tell stories through your voice. Hide
You know, I've just about got used to the fact that people in Britain know who I am on some level, b Show more You know, I've just about got used to the fact that people in Britain know who I am on some level, but the notion that there's any kind of international recognition is still slightly bizarre to me. Hide
On his early decision to become an actor: "I was very small, about 3 or 4 I think, and just wanted t Show more On his early decision to become an actor: "I was very small, about 3 or 4 I think, and just wanted to be the people on telly telling these wonderful stories. Obviously the idea grew and matured with me but I can't ever remember wanting to do anything else. I've just sort of taken it for granted all my life that that was what I would do." Hide
[on his favourite Doctor, Peter Davison] He was "my" Doctor. Just as he was for a whole generation. Show more [on his favourite Doctor, Peter Davison] He was "my" Doctor. Just as he was for a whole generation. For three years in the early 1980s, Peter Davison achieved what many onlookers had feared might be impossible: he stepped effortlessly into Tom Baker's shoes, he proceeded to make Doctor Who (1963) his own and he captured the hearts and minds of millions of young viewers. Hide
I've always been a geek and slightly awkward... slightly umm... I was never the cool kid at school. I've always been a geek and slightly awkward... slightly umm... I was never the cool kid at school.
(On almost being swayed to stay in Doctor Who (2005)) I had a meeting with Steven Moffat and in a wa Show more (On almost being swayed to stay in Doctor Who (2005)) I had a meeting with Steven Moffat and in a way that's been the most difficult bit because I'm such a big fan of his. He told me some of his ideas for what's coming up in the show and it's going to be so good. When I finally thought I'd made a decision suddenly I was tempted to change my mind again. Hide
[Asked to explain his acting process.He bursts out laughing, with his insistence that he doesn't hav Show more [Asked to explain his acting process.He bursts out laughing, with his insistence that he doesn't have one underscored by the T-shirt he happens to be wearing that proclaims, "Anybody Can Do What I Do." But then, playing the good sport, he gives it a shot] It's a bit like wearing in a pair of shoes. You put them on your feet, and at first they squeak and hurt and you can't really walk. But you LIKE these shoes, so you work away at it until the shoes feel comfortable. Hide
I'd love to work with Aaron Sorkin on something. Just the way he writes, he has no fear in writing p Show more I'd love to work with Aaron Sorkin on something. Just the way he writes, he has no fear in writing people that are fiercely intelligent, and I love that. Hide
When you're older, you want to be scared because you understand more where the boundaries between fa Show more When you're older, you want to be scared because you understand more where the boundaries between fantasy and reality are, and I suppose they are more blurred the younger you are. Hide
I remember, after seeing Jon Pertwee turn into Tom Baker in Doctor Who (1963), having a conversation Show more I remember, after seeing Jon Pertwee turn into Tom Baker in Doctor Who (1963), having a conversation with my parents at a very young age about actors and what they did. I remember getting the distinction between a character and an actor, as they explained it. I understood what fiction was very clearly - and I always feel uneasy when people talk about children not understanding the difference between fantasy and reality. I can only have been three, and was just enthralled by Doctor Who (1963). But I was quite clear that I didn't want to be a Time Lord - I wanted to be the person who played a Time Lord. Hide
I love a bit of political drama; The West Wing (1999) is probably my favourite television series of Show more I love a bit of political drama; The West Wing (1999) is probably my favourite television series of all time. Hide
(on his decision to leave Doctor Who (2005)): If I don't take a deep breath now and move on, I never Show more (on his decision to leave Doctor Who (2005)): If I don't take a deep breath now and move on, I never will. I think it's best I don't outstay my welcome. Hide
The Doctor is the kind of character - because the guest cast is changing all the time, there are ver Show more The Doctor is the kind of character - because the guest cast is changing all the time, there are very few constants in the show, so the 'Doctor'- when you're there, you're in it a lot. You're speaking a lot. Hide
(When asked "If you could be any Doctor, who would you choose to be?", Comic-Con 2009) Splendid chap Show more (When asked "If you could be any Doctor, who would you choose to be?", Comic-Con 2009) Splendid chaps, all of them. I think that's the traditional answer to that question. Hide
The bad guys probably get the better lines, don't they? And they wear less spandex. That would be qu Show more The bad guys probably get the better lines, don't they? And they wear less spandex. That would be quite good. Hide
Paula Milne was really the first thing that drew me to The Politician's Husband (2013). Paula Milne was really the first thing that drew me to The Politician's Husband (2013).
(While making Learners (2007), he commented on his own driving) I do have more speeding points than Show more (While making Learners (2007), he commented on his own driving) I do have more speeding points than are entirely practical - but that's only because I'm up and down on the M4 to Cardiff a lot. They have draconian speeding fines. There'll have been some work going on three weeks previously, so there's one sign saying 'You should be going at 50 miles an hour here' and then 18 cameras to make sure that when inevitably you don't, with nobody else on the road at 3am, they can charge you hundreds and hundreds of pounds for the privilege. Listen, I've just got far too many speeding points. What can I do to defend myself? It's my fault. Hide
(On his final scene in Doctor Who (2005) I never saw my final line coming, but it's absolutely perfe Show more (On his final scene in Doctor Who (2005) I never saw my final line coming, but it's absolutely perfect. That's when Russell is at his finest. Those are his masterstrokes. Hide
(On growing up as a teengager) That's the nature of being a teenager. It felt awkward and ugly and d Show more (On growing up as a teengager) That's the nature of being a teenager. It felt awkward and ugly and different. I felt uncool to the depths of my soul and I've never really recovered from that - I still think I'm uncool. Hide
There is something about the type of imagination that powers Doctor Who (2005). That sweeps up viewe Show more There is something about the type of imagination that powers Doctor Who (2005). That sweeps up viewers and inspires them in unexpected ways. Something about it's mix of the fantastic and the mundane, the far flung with the domestic that is unlike anything else. Hide
If you can sell that you're the King of Scotland, or Henry V on a tiny stage in a studio theatre som Show more If you can sell that you're the King of Scotland, or Henry V on a tiny stage in a studio theatre somewhere, then you can probably sell that you're a starship captain or a time traveler. Hide
The gritty indie films are a lot rarer than the films that aspire to fill multiplexes. The gritty indie films are a lot rarer than the films that aspire to fill multiplexes.
I don't think I have ever done anything for this age of children before, a pre-school audience. Gene Show more I don't think I have ever done anything for this age of children before, a pre-school audience. Generally speaking, we don't have vivid memories of that age and what influenced us, yet clearly they are hugely formative years and it's really important that we can create television of a high quality for that audience. Hide
When you first read a script is the purest moment. That's when you can understand how an audience wi Show more When you first read a script is the purest moment. That's when you can understand how an audience will ultimately receive it. The first reading of the script is so important because you're experiencing it all for the first time, and it's then that you really know if it's going to work or not. Hide
I remember a conversation with my parents about who the people on the TV were, and learning they wer Show more I remember a conversation with my parents about who the people on the TV were, and learning they were actors and they acted out this story and just thinking that was the most fantastic notion, and that's what I want to do. Hide
(On groupie brigades) Billie and I got chased through the traffic once in a car. You expect paparazz Show more (On groupie brigades) Billie and I got chased through the traffic once in a car. You expect paparazzi to do that, but when it's normal people you start to think the world's gone a bit mad. Hide
Drama school is a pretty intense experience and I think it changes who you are. I think I grew up at Show more Drama school is a pretty intense experience and I think it changes who you are. I think I grew up at drama school (which was fairly useful personally as much as professionally) and I certainly got exposed to a huge range of ideas, techniques, and practices that I had no previous experience of. I wouldn't have known what I was doing as an actor if I hadn't gone. Hide
(On kissing John Barrowman at Comic-Con 2009): The moment was right and I felt it was appropriate at Show more (On kissing John Barrowman at Comic-Con 2009): The moment was right and I felt it was appropriate at the time. It's something you know you'll get a headline back home for. Hide
I do thrive on hard work. I do thrive on hard work.
I'm as happy doing 'Postman Pat' as I am doing 'Hamlet.' I'm as happy doing 'Postman Pat' as I am doing 'Hamlet.'
(At the 2006 National Television Awards) I think if my eight-year-old self could see me at the Royal Show more (At the 2006 National Television Awards) I think if my eight-year-old self could see me at the Royal Albert Hall winning a prize for playing the Doctor on telly, he would need a stiff shot of Irn-Bru. Hide
I've been quite lucky in that I've managed to tick off a few of my dream roles, really. Beyond that, Show more I've been quite lucky in that I've managed to tick off a few of my dream roles, really. Beyond that, you wait for the next script to come in that will have the dream role that you don't know exists yet, I suppose. Hide
Twitter! It's like being stalked by committee! Twitter! It's like being stalked by committee!
(On being asked to star in Doctor Who (2005) It was funny, when I first got asked I just laughed! I Show more (On being asked to star in Doctor Who (2005) It was funny, when I first got asked I just laughed! I found it hilarious and impossible! And I remember Russell, very perceptively, saying "Don't say anything now, because I know the experience is quite a weird one." Hide
Relationships are hard enough with the people you're having them with, let alone talking about them Show more Relationships are hard enough with the people you're having them with, let alone talking about them in public. Hide
(On being voted Sexiest Actor): Well, I'm not sure what to say about being called the sexiset actor Show more (On being voted Sexiest Actor): Well, I'm not sure what to say about being called the sexiset actor of the year. I'm very flattered and somewhat bewildered. All I know is that I voted for John Barrowman. However I am unashamedly delighted that Doctor Who (2005) has been voted favourite show. Hide
I love characters who are clever and smart, and you have to run to catch up with. I think there's so Show more I love characters who are clever and smart, and you have to run to catch up with. I think there's something very appealing and rather heroic in that. Hide
I have such fond memories of watching Doctor Who (1963) when I was a kid and growing up, that if I'v Show more I have such fond memories of watching Doctor Who (1963) when I was a kid and growing up, that if I've left anybody anywhere with memories as fond, then I feel like I've done my job. Hide
(On being cast in Casanova (2005)) They wanted him to be a cheeky chappie - that's why his love riva Show more (On being cast in Casanova (2005)) They wanted him to be a cheeky chappie - that's why his love rival is Rupert Penry-Jones, who's 6ft 2in. It was all about the wit and the words Hide
When you're playing a real person, there's a balance between playing the person in the script and pl Show more When you're playing a real person, there's a balance between playing the person in the script and playing the person as he was in life. You have to be respectful and true to who that person was, but at the same time tell the story in the film. Hide
It's always that tricky thing with a remake, especially when it's something that's well loved. You'r Show more It's always that tricky thing with a remake, especially when it's something that's well loved. You're coming to something that has a built-in fascination, but with that comes people ready to feel disgruntled that it's being remade at all. Hide
I'm a good person, I hope. But I'm never as good as I want to be, never as nice as I want to be, nev Show more I'm a good person, I hope. But I'm never as good as I want to be, never as nice as I want to be, never as generous as I want to be. Hide
David Tennant's FILMOGRAPHY
as Actor (101)
David Tennant David Tennant'S roles
Barty Crouch Jr.
Barty Crouch Jr.

Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin

Himself - Guest
Himself - Guest

The Fugitoid
The Fugitoid

Himself - Guest
Himself - Guest

Spitelout Jorgenson
Spitelout Jorgenson

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