#
buy premium
Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Birthday: 17 February 1981, Los Angeles, California, USA
Birth Name: Joseph Leonard Gordon-Levitt
Height: 176 cm

Joseph Leonard Gordon-Levitt was born February 17, 1981 in Los Angeles, California, to Jane Gordon and Dennis Levitt. Joseph was raised in a Jewish family with his late older brother, Dan Gordon-Levit ...Show more

Joseph Gordon-Levitt
I just love to act. It's my favorite thing to do in the world, and what keeps it interesting to me i Show more I just love to act. It's my favorite thing to do in the world, and what keeps it interesting to me is the creative challenge. So different kinds of characters, that's what I just love to do. Hide
Actors didn't use to be celebrities. A hundred years ago, they put the theaters next to the brothels Show more Actors didn't use to be celebrities. A hundred years ago, they put the theaters next to the brothels. Actors were poor. Celebrities used to be kings and queens. Then the United States abolished monarchy, and now there's this coming together of show business and celebrity. I don't think it's healthy. I don't want to sound self-important, but all these celebrity shows and magazines--it comes from us, from Hollywood, from our country. We're the ones creating it. And I think it works in close step with a lot of other bad things that are happening in the world. It promotes greed, it promotes being selfish and it promotes this ladder, where you're a better person if you have more money. It's not at all about the work itself. Don't get me wrong. I love movies. But this myth of celebrity has nothing to do with movies. Hide
[in 2004, about Mysterious Skin (2004)] At the heart of the movie, to me, is there's these two chara Show more [in 2004, about Mysterious Skin (2004)] At the heart of the movie, to me, is there's these two characters that can have one horrible, traumatic experience but react to it in opposite ways and it shows how different people see things differently. Well, today, there's a president in my country that doesn't understand that and he thinks that if you don't see it exactly his way, you're wrong and evil. And that's not the way the world works. There can be one event but everybody who sees it sees it a little different or sees it a lot different and that's what the movies about and that's what damn "Dubya" [President George W. Bush] needs to understand. Or let him not understand it and go about his ways and go back to his ranch and never bother us again. Hide
[About the violence in Mysterious Skin (2004)] All that violence is there to tell a story that comes Show more [About the violence in Mysterious Skin (2004)] All that violence is there to tell a story that comes from an honest and genuine place, and that's what's important. Hide
I'v always loved watching. I spent my whole life on sets. I started working when I was six. I always Show more I'v always loved watching. I spent my whole life on sets. I started working when I was six. I always paid a lot of attention to what directors have done and what everyone else has done: what they are doing over here in the camera department or how they put together the set or what the script supervisor is up to, all these notes that they take, how is it, what is that. I really like being part of that team, being a part of something larger. Hide
The traditional Hollywood sentiment is contempt for the audience. I've heard executives say, "Audien Show more The traditional Hollywood sentiment is contempt for the audience. I've heard executives say, "Audiences are stupid, kids are stupid", but that's not going to fly anymore. I think [Barack Obama] is great evidence of that. This is maybe a sort of pretentious parallel to draw, but it's the same with how love stories are told in movies. (500) Days of Summer (2009) wouldn't have made sense in our parents' generation. It reminds me so much of 2009. Hide
I spent a lot of time--most of my days--thinking about what it would be like to be facing death whil Show more I spent a lot of time--most of my days--thinking about what it would be like to be facing death while I was shooting 50/50 (2011). But to be honest, I think about that all the time anyway. Hide
Most scripts are bad. I read a lot of them. Brick (2005) was a good script just to read. It was like Show more Most scripts are bad. I read a lot of them. Brick (2005) was a good script just to read. It was like, "Oh my God, these words feel so good in my mouth". A lot of movies try to set up a world with cool sets, costumes, camera work. In Brick (2005), the world is born from the words. Hide
[on his parents' political activism as youths] My dad never blew anything up, but he probably had fr Show more [on his parents' political activism as youths] My dad never blew anything up, but he probably had friends who did. He and my mom have always preached that the pen is mightier than a Molotov cocktail. Hide
[in (2012] Being on TV when I was a teenager in high school was way harder than anything I've experi Show more [in (2012] Being on TV when I was a teenager in high school was way harder than anything I've experienced since. It prepared me for what it is to work in pop culture. I've learned I have basically two different interactions with people. I love when someone approaches me and tells me they've seen me in something that made them feel something and that they connected to it. That's part of why I do it. The other interaction is with people who really don't care about the movies or anything like that. They just sort of buy into the fame thing, and that feels icky to me. Hide
The Lookout (2007) was by far the hardest thing I've ever done. Partially because both Brick (2005) Show more The Lookout (2007) was by far the hardest thing I've ever done. Partially because both Brick (2005) and Mysterious Skin (2004) were four- to five-week shoots, and "The Lookout" was nine or ten. So there's the marathon aspect, as well as the fact that Chris Pratt is having a harder go of it than either of the other two characters ever did. You know, waking up in the morning is difficult for him. Putting a sentence together is difficult for him. Getting dressed properly, driving a car, all these things. He can do them fine, but it's just much harder than it is for a normal person, so I had to try to make it hard for myself somehow. So it was challenging. Hide
I'm lucky enough, I made money on television when I was young, so I don't have to do parts to suppor Show more I'm lucky enough, I made money on television when I was young, so I don't have to do parts to support myself. I just do stuff because it'll be fun and challenge me. Hide
[in 2015] To me, having worked in both low-budget films and bigger-budget studio films, the importan Show more [in 2015] To me, having worked in both low-budget films and bigger-budget studio films, the important thing is actually not the budget. The important thing is the motivation of the filmmaker, and everyone who is working for the filmmaker. You can find indie movies that are just sort of being derivative and trying to make a name for themselves, and you can also find studio movies with a real sincere heart. It's really more about the individual people than the budget or the corporate infrastructure. Hide
One of the hardest things about playing a soldier is kinda acknowledging that I've never done, and m Show more One of the hardest things about playing a soldier is kinda acknowledging that I've never done, and might never do anything that brave. Hide
[on Don Jon (2013)] Actors in our culture do get stigmatized and treated like objects on a shelf som Show more [on Don Jon (2013)] Actors in our culture do get stigmatized and treated like objects on a shelf sometimes. But I don't think it's just actors. I think everybody experiences this. You are talking to someone and you can tell they are not listening. You can tell they have already decided what you are and put you in a box with a label on it. This is what I was trying to make fun of. And I do think that the media contributes to this. That's where I came to the idea of a relationship of a young man who watches too much pornography and a young woman ho watches too many romantic Hollywood movies They've both got these unrealistic expectations that they've learned from these kinds of media they consume, and it leads them to objectify people or not to connect. Hide
Acting's really difficult to talk about. If you could talk about it so easily then you wouldn't have Show more Acting's really difficult to talk about. If you could talk about it so easily then you wouldn't have to act. Hide
[on his transition from television to film work] I'm sure luck has a lot to do with it, I wouldn't d Show more [on his transition from television to film work] I'm sure luck has a lot to do with it, I wouldn't deny that. For a while, after [3rd Rock from the Sun (1996)] no one wanted to hire me to do anything but a TV show, and I didn't really want to do that again. I'm grateful to a few filmmakers who took a chance on me, like Gregg Araki, who made Mysterious Skin (2004), or Rian Johnson, who made Brick (2005). These are guys who were able to see that I could play these other roles. I really owe them all my subsequent opportunities. Hide
I just feel really lucky to get to do what I do and I love it. I love acting, I love making movies a Show more I just feel really lucky to get to do what I do and I love it. I love acting, I love making movies and that's why I do it. This is a job which I try to get involved with as much as I can. The movies I watch are being made by film lovers. That's the thing about Uncertainty (2008). All that "Uncertainty" has going for it is the film itself. We don't have an advertisement budget or something; it's really just made by people who love movies for people who love movies . . . I'm happy to get to talk to someone like you who obviously really loves movies for the movies themselves because some of the other ways that tend to putting audiences into a movie have less to do with an actual movie and more to do with all sort of other marketing. Hide
I take that as a big compliment for you to say that that you thought of me as an indie guy just beca Show more I take that as a big compliment for you to say that that you thought of me as an indie guy just because it took a long time to get anybody to think of me that way 'cause I was on a TV show for so long [laughs]. But yeah, I mean, to me, I don't really make such a distinction based on indie or studio or any of that. What's important to me is the work itself, the script, the other people I'm collaborating, and I think that kind of could happen to me in the big studio world and it could happen in the indie world. I got just done working for [Christopher Nolan], which was a real honor. He brings as much artistic integrity to what he's doing as anybody and he's making these enormous, enormous studio movies. Then there's Uncertainty (2008), where they bring the same artistic integrity to it. There's the other way on both sides. There's plenty of low-budget indie movies that are kinda doing it for the wrong reasons just like there's some great, huge studio movies. Hide
[on the conclusion of The Dark Knight trilogy] I know we're all used to the sort of Marvel movies, w Show more [on the conclusion of The Dark Knight trilogy] I know we're all used to the sort of Marvel movies, which are just kind of endless series they don't really have a beginning, middle, and end. But I think Christopher Nolan very much thought of The Dark Knight Rises as a conclusion, and there's a theme that runs through all three of those movies that begins in the first movie, runs through the second movie, and it concludes in that moment where he says that Batman is more than a man, Batman is a symbol and so to have another man other than Bruce Wayne kind of becoming Batman at the end of that trilogy, I think that's the perfect ending to that story. Hide
[in 2012] I wouldn't say I was a normal kid. I'd say I was a lucky little kid, because unfortunately Show more [in 2012] I wouldn't say I was a normal kid. I'd say I was a lucky little kid, because unfortunately it's not normal to have extraordinarily good parents who love and support you. I played baseball, did gymnastics, took piano lessons and started acting as just another one of the things I did. I wasn't pressured into it. But it was acting I loved. I had a really cool acting teacher who taught us how to become a character, to be realistic and feel those feelings, so I hated being expected to behave like an idiot in TV commercials because they seem to think that's what sells toys or whatever. Hide
[in 2012] As a teenager in the 1990s I loved the spike of indie films coming through Sundance, and f Show more [in 2012] As a teenager in the 1990s I loved the spike of indie films coming through Sundance, and films like Pulp Fiction (1994), Big Night (1996), Sling Blade (1996), Trees Lounge (1996) and Swingers (1996). Had I said to my agents at the time that I wanted to do that stuff, they would have said, "You're making a ton of money doing TV, and that's what you're going to do." I went to school, quit acting for a while, and when I came back everyone wanted me to do another TV show and make more money. I didn't want to. I made a decision that I was going to do only work that inspired me creatively, not what was supposed to be good for my career. Hide
If you want to talk about an immoral movie, those are the movies that are just blindly reinforcing t Show more If you want to talk about an immoral movie, those are the movies that are just blindly reinforcing these clichés of love at first sight, first kiss . . . get married and ride off together into the sunset. It's systematically ruining people's lives. Hide
The most valiant thing you can do as an artist is inspire someone else to be creative. The most valiant thing you can do as an artist is inspire someone else to be creative.
I've had a select set of really beautiful, powerful, psychedelic experiences on certain drugs but I Show more I've had a select set of really beautiful, powerful, psychedelic experiences on certain drugs but I never got into just doing it at a party: "Oh let's get fucked up and drop acid". That's so retarded and disrespectful to your body and the drug itself. Mushrooms, acid and ecstasy can offer you a new perspective. They can also offer you nothing. Hide
That's what life is: repetitive routines. It's a matter of finding the balance between deviating fro Show more That's what life is: repetitive routines. It's a matter of finding the balance between deviating from those patterns and knowing when to repeat them. Hide
My favorite kinds of actors are the chameleons, like Daniel Day-Lewis or Peter Sellers, people like Show more My favorite kinds of actors are the chameleons, like Daniel Day-Lewis or Peter Sellers, people like that. To me, the highest compliment you can pay to an actor is, "Man, I didn't recognize you". So yeah, Hesher (2010) is really different from "Tom" in (500) Days of Summer (2009) and you know, that's what keeps it spicy for me. Hide
I've played the smart kid, the funny one, the nice sweet one, even the angry one, but never the sexy Show more I've played the smart kid, the funny one, the nice sweet one, even the angry one, but never the sexy one. Hide
There is a quote that I think is attributed to Nelson Mandela. He said that our light is more fright Show more There is a quote that I think is attributed to Nelson Mandela. He said that our light is more frightening than our darkness because if you look at the darkness within yourself, you can make excuses and shirk the responsibility of having to do anything, and say, 'Well, I'm not capable'. But if you recognize the powerful light that is in yourself, that we all have within ourselves, that's scary because with that light comes a certain responsibility to live up to it and do something. I love that quote. I think about it a lot. Hide
The whole concept of celebrity pisses me off. While I'm not a celebrity, it's such a weird concept t Show more The whole concept of celebrity pisses me off. While I'm not a celebrity, it's such a weird concept that society has cooked up for us. Astronauts and teachers are much more amazing than actors. Hide
I find that humor is often times the best way to get at substantial themes and questions--but to do Show more I find that humor is often times the best way to get at substantial themes and questions--but to do so in a really entertaining and engaging way. Something everybody can connect to. Take Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964), one of my favorite movies of all time. And it's dealing with very serious issues. But it's hilarious. Hide
To me, a sex scene in a movie generally means a gratuitous scene that doesn't serve the story but gi Show more To me, a sex scene in a movie generally means a gratuitous scene that doesn't serve the story but gives a kind of excuse; we've got these two actors, we want to see them naked, so let's bring in the music and the soft light. Hide
I don't blame the people for the fact that so many movies are bad. I think there's a corrupt, perver Show more I don't blame the people for the fact that so many movies are bad. I think there's a corrupt, perverted, lazy and sloppy attitude that's pervasive in the movie business. The whole entertainment business is kind of crumbling around us. Hide
[in 2012, on working with Christian Bale on The Dark Knight Rises (2012)] We had a fucking great tim Show more [in 2012, on working with Christian Bale on The Dark Knight Rises (2012)] We had a fucking great time every day working on that movie. I felt as though I'd transferred in for senior year and had a graduation celebration. You felt a huge sense of accomplishment and closure. Everyone on that movie did such good, dignified work. No one came to phone it in or just cash a check. Hide
[on facing fame and the paparazzi] Look, I've met some nice guys who take pictures like that. I don' Show more [on facing fame and the paparazzi] Look, I've met some nice guys who take pictures like that. I don't want to demonize anybody. But I do think that this notion that certain people are in a higher class than other people is unhealthy. We would be healthier as a people if we quit paying attention to that kind of bullshit and paid more attention to more pertinent things and more beautiful things. Hide
Most love stories that are told in Hollywood are just bullshit, and everyone knows it. You go there Show more Most love stories that are told in Hollywood are just bullshit, and everyone knows it. You go there expecting to be sold a bill of goods that you know is wrong. And sometimes you go anyway, like if a girl drags you or something. Hide
The thing Chris [Christopher Nolan] has in common with all the filmmakers I've loved--Rian Johnson, Show more The thing Chris [Christopher Nolan] has in common with all the filmmakers I've loved--Rian Johnson, Steven Spielberg, Marc Webb--is that they have a thorough plan, but are also open to spontaneity. That happens all day as a director. Someone tells you things have changed, and you have to answer it. Spielberg is one of the great imitated filmmakers. Hide
[in 2012] I remember on Beethoven (1992) we weren't allowed to pet the dog because it would have dis Show more [in 2012] I remember on Beethoven (1992) we weren't allowed to pet the dog because it would have distracted him. For a dog lover that was disappointing and weird. Hide
My advantage is that I know the system. Big budgets don't impress me. They might've done [that] when Show more My advantage is that I know the system. Big budgets don't impress me. They might've done [that] when I was 13, but I've been working since I was six. Hide
It's a very ritualized practice: First they say "Rolling" and then they say "Speed" and then they sa Show more It's a very ritualized practice: First they say "Rolling" and then they say "Speed" and then they say "Marker" they clap the marker, then the camera says "Set", then the director says "Action". I've heard that sequence of words ever since I was six years old. It's powerful. I need that. Hide
T0 me what's important is not the budget of the movie or where the money came from, whether it came Show more T0 me what's important is not the budget of the movie or where the money came from, whether it came from Warner Brothers or Voltage Pictures. What's important for me is the intention of the filmmaker and the spirit on set and what the movie's about and why we are all making it. Hide
Hesher (2010) is easily one of the most fun parts I've ever gotten to play, because he is really lib Show more Hesher (2010) is easily one of the most fun parts I've ever gotten to play, because he is really liberated from a lot of the anxieties and stresses that we all carry around. So to play the part right, I have to do that, and it was liberating. Hide
To be honest, I sort of feel like "movie actor" isn't of this time. I love it. But it's a 20th-centu Show more To be honest, I sort of feel like "movie actor" isn't of this time. I love it. But it's a 20th-century art form. Hide
Success is not important to me, nor are power or money. If the script feels good, then I'm in. It's Show more Success is not important to me, nor are power or money. If the script feels good, then I'm in. It's that simple. Hide
Joseph Gordon-Levitt's FILMOGRAPHY
All as Actor (88) as Director (1) as Creator (1)
Joseph Gordon-Levitt Joseph Gordon-Levitt'S roles
Hesher
Hesher

Jimmy Howell
Jimmy Howell

Cameron James
Cameron James

Jon
Jon

George
George

Dr. Don
Dr. Don

Show More
Solarmovie