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Wes Craven

Wes Craven

Birthday: 2 August 1939, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
Birth Name: Wesley Earl Craven
Height: 188 cm

Wes Craven has become synonymous with genre bending and innovative horror, challenging audiences with his bold vision.Wesley Earl Craven was born in Cleveland, Ohio, to Caroline (Miller) and Paul Euge ...Show more

Wes Craven
For me with all this stuff, both the horror films and thrillers like this, the most interesting thin Show more For me with all this stuff, both the horror films and thrillers like this, the most interesting thing is what goes on inside people's heads. Hide
I like to address the fears of my culture. I believe it's good to face the enemy, for the enemy is f Show more I like to address the fears of my culture. I believe it's good to face the enemy, for the enemy is fear. Hide
I think there is something about the American dream, the sort of Disneyesque dream, if you will, of Show more I think there is something about the American dream, the sort of Disneyesque dream, if you will, of the beautifully trimmed front lawn, the white picket fence, mom and dad and their happy children, God-fearing and doing good whenever they can, and the flip side of it, the kind of anger and the sense of outrage that comes from discovering that that's not the truth of the matter, that gives American horror films, in some ways, kind of an additional rage. Hide
I think sometimes you might expect or want greater recognition. But to me it's a little like how Fre Show more I think sometimes you might expect or want greater recognition. But to me it's a little like how French Impressionists felt about formal recognition. You know, once you're a member of the academy you never pose any danger or threat. I don't know if I'd like that. Hide
I learned to take the first job that you have in the business that you want to get into. It doesn't Show more I learned to take the first job that you have in the business that you want to get into. It doesn't matter what that job is, you get your foot in the door. Hide
[on his 1995 movie Vampire in Brooklyn] That was kind of a screwed-up thing, because I wanted to wor Show more [on his 1995 movie Vampire in Brooklyn] That was kind of a screwed-up thing, because I wanted to work with a big star. I suppose it could have been better if it were a horror movie, but it wasn't. Eddie (Murphy) didn't want to be funny. He wanted to be serious and he was very difficult. Hide
It seems like all the powerful people on earth just want to build condos and knock down all the tree Show more It seems like all the powerful people on earth just want to build condos and knock down all the trees... As somebody once said with wonderful succinctness, the golf course is man's boot on the neck of nature. Hide
On horror movies: "It's like boot camp for the psyche. In real life, human beings are packaged in th Show more On horror movies: "It's like boot camp for the psyche. In real life, human beings are packaged in the flimsiest of packages, threatened by real and sometimes horrifying dangers, events like Columbine. But the narrative form puts these fears into a manageable series of events. It gives us a way of thinking rationally about our fears." Hide
In retrospect, it's usually pretty easy to look at horror movies and see the influences of the time. Show more In retrospect, it's usually pretty easy to look at horror movies and see the influences of the time. And I think right now, with the post-9-11 world and Iraq, creative people are almost being goaded to look at things in the strongest way possible. If you look at the Academy Awards [movies], those are films about real issues. I think everybody is saying, 'We have to talk about the nitty-gritty stuff here.' It's not the time for confections. [March 2006] Hide
A producer said, 'Make a horror movie'. I said 'I've never seen one.' He said, 'You're a fundamental Show more A producer said, 'Make a horror movie'. I said 'I've never seen one.' He said, 'You're a fundamentalist, you must have demons rattling around. Hide
I've always felt like [Scream's] Sidney or [A Nightmare on Elm Street's] Nancy could never go back t Show more I've always felt like [Scream's] Sidney or [A Nightmare on Elm Street's] Nancy could never go back to that state of mind that they were in before, but that's the life of a warrior, and in a sense, there are no more civilians anymore. You're a warrior. You're in combat. Because the whole world's in combat. Hide
There is rage in my films, but it's a complete matrix. Sone could be directed at my father, a scary Show more There is rage in my films, but it's a complete matrix. Sone could be directed at my father, a scary figure. Hide
The horrors of retirement. These are scarier than any horror movie I can dream up. The horrors of retirement. These are scarier than any horror movie I can dream up.
Horror movies have to show us something that hasn't been shown before so that the audience is comple Show more Horror movies have to show us something that hasn't been shown before so that the audience is completely taken aback. You see, it's not just that people want to be scared; people are scared. Hide
[on horror films in general] I think they can work two ways. They can distort the reality of violenc Show more [on horror films in general] I think they can work two ways. They can distort the reality of violence in a way that makes it seem very attractive; they can show the Dionysian side, which is a whole orgiastic, cruel thing, getting off on the suffering of other people. I think that's a very dangerous kind of horror film. I try to make the kind that shows the end result of violence is something quite appalling. But in the long view, I'm not so sure anymore what the hell it all means. Hide
When you have an idea that really fascinates you and you can honestly say, 'I've never seen anything Show more When you have an idea that really fascinates you and you can honestly say, 'I've never seen anything like that,' what you get is, you get that first audience goes out and tells everybody. And the reason they do that is they've never seen anything like it. You're trying to be the avant-garde of horror. That's where you want to be. Hide
You don't enter the theater and pay your money to be afraid. You enter the theater and pay your mone Show more You don't enter the theater and pay your money to be afraid. You enter the theater and pay your money to have the fears that are already in you when you go into a theater dealt with and put into a narrative. Stories and narratives are one of the most powerful things in humanity. They're devices for dealing with the chaotic danger of existence. Hide
[on the film business] It's a strange business, because once you finish a film, there's this deafeni Show more [on the film business] It's a strange business, because once you finish a film, there's this deafening silence and you say, "I'm not working," and the phone doesn't ring. You utterly panic. It's harrowing. Everything is so short-term, so dependent on the whim of public taste and business things you have no control over, like how the economy is going, and how well your film is distributed, or what ad campaign they come up with, or even what the title is. Hide
[on his 1996 movie Scream] It's almost on a comic book level as far as the danger. And also kind of Show more [on his 1996 movie Scream] It's almost on a comic book level as far as the danger. And also kind of soap opera-ish. Hide
You have a responsibility to really help the [horror] genre grow, 'cause there's no limit to how pro Show more You have a responsibility to really help the [horror] genre grow, 'cause there's no limit to how profound it can become. If you go back to those guys like [Federico] Fellini and [Luis] Buñuel, talking about really profound things. Now, I don't know whether you can get a big audience with films that abstruse, but you can in horror if you scare the shit out of them about every eight minutes. So you do a fun deal with the devil: I've got to put a lot of interesting ideas, but I'll hide them and I'll also scare people and make them laugh. Hide
[on A nightmare on Elm Street having sequels] I thought they'll never be a sequel. Boy was I stupid. [on A nightmare on Elm Street having sequels] I thought they'll never be a sequel. Boy was I stupid.
The first monster you have to scare the audience with is yourself. The first monster you have to scare the audience with is yourself.
I believe the cinema is one of our principal forms of art. It is an incredibly powerful way to tell Show more I believe the cinema is one of our principal forms of art. It is an incredibly powerful way to tell uplifitng stories that can move people to cry with joy and inspire them to reach for the stars. Hide
Horror films don't create fear. They release it. Horror films don't create fear. They release it.
Certainly the deepest horror, as far as I'm concerned, is what happens to your body at your own hand Show more Certainly the deepest horror, as far as I'm concerned, is what happens to your body at your own hands and others. Hide
What you want to do is you want to put your audience off-balance. You have to be aware of what the a Show more What you want to do is you want to put your audience off-balance. You have to be aware of what the audience's expectations are, and then you have to pervert them, basically, and hit them upside the head from a direction they weren't looking. Hide
[on how he got Drew Barrymore to look scared and crying in Scream] Drew Barrymore told me a story of Show more [on how he got Drew Barrymore to look scared and crying in Scream] Drew Barrymore told me a story of a boy who tortured his...I think it was his dog, with a lighter and it set it on fire and she burst into tears. And being the exploitative bastard that I am as a director, I said "do you mind if we use that?"So every time on the set if I wanted her to cry, I'd say "the boy has the lighter" or something like that, and she'd burst into tears and be just frantic. Hide
If I were interested in reality, I'd be making documentaries. If I were interested in reality, I'd be making documentaries.
[on his 1999 movie Music of the Heart] That's my mom's favorite movie of mine, because it was the on Show more [on his 1999 movie Music of the Heart] That's my mom's favorite movie of mine, because it was the only one she saw. It was something that I was really drawn to. Horror films are not me, or they're not all of me. They're a very thin slice of me. Hide
It was a great pleasure to make [Music of the Heart], and to see Meryl [Streep] nominated [for a bes Show more It was a great pleasure to make [Music of the Heart], and to see Meryl [Streep] nominated [for a best actress Oscar] for it. But most of the people I run into who loved it are surprised that I made it. When you have a name that means scares, you have to live with that. Hide
'Happy wife, happy life' is a mantra it seems unwise to ignore. 'Happy wife, happy life' is a mantra it seems unwise to ignore.
"If we don't get out of Iraq soon, it'll be like A Nightmare on Elm Street" (April 2007) "If we don't get out of Iraq soon, it'll be like A Nightmare on Elm Street" (April 2007)
Wes Craven Wes Craven'S roles
Wes Craven
Wes Craven

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